From Naughty to Nice: Following My Muse Across Genres. A Guest Post From Jackson D’Lynne

12 Sep

There seems to be a misconception among romance readers; once an author has written in a specific genre, they are locked into the genre, and therefore spice level, until they give up ghost.

What a load of shit.

Guest author Jackson D'Lynne

Guest author Jackson D’Lynne

Most authors are driven by their passion, their muse, and the money they make from writing, which means that while one genre birthed their careers, they are in no way shackled to it. The market dictates what is popular and therefore what readers are buying.

Lots of authors change up their genres to fit the market, and I’m all for that as long as you can do it while still staying true to your muse.

I began writing fiction in elementary school, and I have been writing bits and pieces here and there over the years. But I didn’t begin writing books until 2012. I published my first book in March of that year, and guess what? It was a book of Christian poetry and short stories.

How then did I end up on this website, you ask?

Click on image to buy!

Click on image to buy!

Well, in 2014, I switched it up and wrote and published a deliciously smutty time travel paranormal novel, The Diva and the Duke, the first book in my The Three Goddesses Series. While I am a born-again Christian, not every story idea my muse conjures up is SFC (safe for church), and the idea for that particular book series plagued me until I gave in and wrote it.

I officially switched up genres, in a big way.

The Diva and the Duke was so unlike what I’d written before that my mother-in-law refused to read it. Her right, her loss. While my MIL didn’t like it, someone did because it reached the Amazon Bestseller’s List twice.

In 2015, I wrote and published my second smutfest, The Rancher and the Renegade—it was full of smexiness, filthy language, and an utterly deviant villain. It was longer and naughtier than the first book, and therefore even further from the squeaky clean book I’d written in 2012.

Now, were in 2016 and my muse is no longer happy with just writing paranormal romance. She wants adventure, she wants dark tales, she wants clean, sweet romantic tales that would make fans of Little House on the Prairie sell their last pail of milk to own it.

Click on image to buy!

Click on image to buy!

My muse, who I lovingly call “Ellari, Sorceress of the Pen”, is now conjuring up story ideas for several YA Sci-Fis and thrillers, a sweet fantasy standalone, a bloody and suspenseful adult thriller, a time-travel pirate trilogy, a dark medieval fantasy, a series of erotic novellas set in space, and the book series I am currently writing for Dragonblade Publishing: Dry Bayou Brides.

As someone who lives and dies by her muse, I’ve never been one to tell her no, and so I’ve decided to give her the lead. She’s told me to write a brand new sweet western romance series, and so I am. The first book in my new Dry Bayou Brides series is The Shepherd’s Daughter (set for release September 27, 2016), and it is so far from what I’ve written before that I am petrified at what fans of my naughty books will think.

Will they like it? Do they expect me to sneak sexy bits in between the pages? Will they think I’ve turned my back on spicy books?

Coming September 27, 2016!

Coming September 27, 2016!

As an author, readers are my bread and butter, and without them I am left with lots of words to write and no one reading them. But because writing is my passion, and my muse and I are a team, I am taking a chance at writing outside the box in which my career began.

I’m taking a chance on my new genre, will you?

Jackson D’Lynne is one of the pseudonyms of a hardworking mother of four trapped in rural Pennsylvania. When she isn’t writing naughty paranormal romance, she is writing sweet historical romance as Lynn Winchester. When she isn’t writing at all, she is reading, playing Diablo III, having long conversations with her cat, Nix, or watching Netflix and chilling with her husband of 12 years.

You can catch up with Jackson on Facebook and Twitter.

Follow Lady Smut–we’ll be super nice to all your naughty.

5 Responses to “From Naughty to Nice: Following My Muse Across Genres. A Guest Post From Jackson D’Lynne”

  1. Madeline Iva September 13, 2016 at 1:46 pm #

    I loved this blog post Jackson! I want it all — to write it all, to read it all, to enjoy everyone who feels the same way! 🙂

    Like

    • Jackson September 13, 2016 at 3:02 pm #

      I have plans to write books in five different genres, most of them not even romance! The muse is an out-of-the-box kind of girl, and I will follow her anywhere!

      Like

  2. Leah St. James September 12, 2016 at 6:58 pm #

    I think you’re my hero, Jackson! I’ve written from smutty to children’s (yes, quite a stretch). I’ve been shunned by a loved one who didn’t like the smutty one (“You’re better than that,” she said)…although I took it as a compliment when she said it reminded her of Patricia Cornwell. 🙂 Looks like you’re doing the wise thing (using different names). Enjoy whatever path your muse leads you!

    Like

    • Jackson September 13, 2016 at 10:51 am #

      Daawww! Thanks, Leah. Yeah, it’s difficult to be despised by those you love because of what you choose to write. It wasn’t that my MIL doesn’t read romance, I think she was more shocked that I WROTE something that smutty. She never saw it coming, and now I always wonder if she’s worried I will turn my children, her grandchildren, into little smut-gobblers.

      Using different pen names seems like a requirement when changing genres so drastically. All the greats do it, right? J.D. Robb, J.K. Rowling, Jackson D’Lynne…

      I didn’t want fans of my paranormal romance to read my name on the sweet stuff and assume it isn’t as sweet as the publisher says–OR read the sweet stuff expecting for secret trysts and heaving bosoms.

      Like

  3. Kel September 12, 2016 at 10:19 am #

    I absolutely think that authors should write whatever stories they want to, in whatever genres they want to, and when I enjoy their voice, I tend to follow across genres. I do think that when crossing from explicit material to YA or child-oriented writing, there might need to be some obvious delineation between works, though.

    Like

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