Tag Archives: Porn

What’s Worse Than Faking an Orgasm? Fake Science Slamming Porn

26 Mar

By Elizabeth Shore

Legislatures in Kansas have a lot keeping them busy these days. School funding is an enormous problem. Corporate control of the poultry industry and fighting pesticide-resistant noxious weeds are two more. But the legislatures of Kansas recently decided that their focus should be on something even more pressing: drawing inaccurate conclusions about porn, backing them up with fake science, and passing resolutions to deal with a hazard that doesn’t exist. Good on ya, Kansas legislatures!

While it’s tempting to blow off these nitwits with a chuckle and a snort, the problems they create with their puritanical agendas are all too real. As pointed out in a recent Huffington Post article, the Senate Resolution 1762 declaring porn a public health crisis is more ceremonial than anything, putting a stamp on conservative politicians’ ideology. It has no immediate bearing on the law. Yet what it does do is ellicit conversations that start on the basis of falsehoods and inaccuracies. Suddenly, like brush fires in a stiff wind, such conversations swirl wildly out of control, spreading their fallacies from water coolers to watering holes and beyond. Politicians pick up the baton, deciding they need to save us all from something that doesn’t exist and before you can say WTF we’ve got a resolution on our hands.

Beyond conversations where people quote falsehoods as fact, a very real downside of passing resolutions such as 1762 is that, according to Kansas Senator David Haley, it could “funnel precious funding toward what is indeed not a health crisis, when we really need those dollars for true health crises.” Like fighting the flu epidemic, for example. Kansas recently surpassed Missouri to claim the #1 spot in the country as having the highest percentage of people showing flu-like symptoms. And that, legislatures, is based on scientific fact. Not fake. Perhaps your attention should shift to that? Just sayin.

We all know the porn industry is made up of all things titillating and as such is simultaneously sought after and shunned. People are quick to denounce it while searching for free videos on RedTube.com. Those in the adult film industry can have life-long stigmas attached to them, as if they alone have cast the world into a cesspool of debauchery and corrupted innocent minds. And hey, we all have choices. If you don’t like porn, or think it’s wrong, or don’t want your kids exposed to it, have at it. That’s the great thing about a free society. We all have that choice. What’s not great is when others try to make choices for us by quoting “facts” that are untrue and twisting the truth to support an agenda.

In the case of the Kansas legislature, the measure it passed about the porn industry references a study supporters say backs their claims about the evils of childhood porn consumption. Except the “study” is actually nothing more than online surveys funded by the evangelical Christian church. As sexual psychophysiologist Dr. Nicolas Pause notes, such surveys are definitively “not science.”

What else do passing these types of measures do? They divert funding away from addressing actual health issues, thereby endangering the very children the fake science porn resolution is supposedly helping. And that’s not fake news at all. It’s just plain dumb.

Elizabeth Shore writes contemporary and historical erotic romance. She’s the author of Hot Bayou NightsDesire RisingThe Lady Smut Book of Dark Desires and (as Liz Madison) Season of Splendor and With His Promise. Her next release, Hot Bayou Fire, the second in the Bayou series, will be out in 2018. Release date announced as soon as it’s known. 

Sexy Saturday Round Up

16 Sep

By Elizabeth Mattila

Hey sexies! We’ve rounded up a truly eclectic mix of fun, weird, and get-the-fan-out scorching hot links for you from around the web. Sit back and enjoy. xoxo 

The season of scare is about to descend. It has already floated into theaters, but if that isn’t enough for you, check out this round-up of the creepiest that 2017 has to offer – so far.

Hey leaf peepers, your interactive fall foliage map has arrived.

Total mysogynist a-hole moron goes on live TV and gives women yet another reason to hate him.

Want to have a great orgasm? First get yourself a good massage…down there.

Want to have lots of great orgasms? 5 tips for landing multiple trips to the promised land.

Drool alert! Blazing hot Will Wikle takes all his clothes off…and we get to watch.

So you really like him? Then do not say these seven things.

R.I.P Harry Dean Stanton.

Who doesn’t like Ted Cruz “liking” a porn video? Porn stars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Decent Acting, Gorgeous People, And BDSM! So Why Didn’t Anyone Watch Submission?

10 May

By Elizabeth Shore

A few days ago I found myself without anything to do. Well, technically, there’s always s**t to do, but nothing I felt like tackling. The solution? Cruise my way down couch jockey street, flipping channels until I landed on some mind-numbing goodness for a few hours of escape. Drink in one hand, remote in the other, I found Submission, a 6-episode series that aired last year on Showtime. Wait…last year?! Why hadn’t I heard of it? Admittedly, I’m not always hip to the latest on TV, but still. This show was right up my erotic romance alley and yet until recently had gone undiscovered.

Naturally, I binge-watched all six episodes. Not terribly impressive since they were each like 28 minutes long. Yet once I finished watching I really was perplexed about why no one’s been talking about this show. Let’s run down the list of attractions: beautiful actors (standard fare for TV shows, but still); not bad plotline, decent writing, money from Showtime. Oh, and sex. Lots and lots and lots of sex! BDSM, F/F, regular M/F, even ménage. And it was hot, too. A scene between one of the series’ main characters and an impromptu meet-up in the ladies’ room had me coming back ’round for a second viewing. De-lish!

It’s not surprising that the sex scenes are a major focus of the series. Its two creators, Jacky St. James and Paul Fishbein, have well-established creds in the adult video world. Fishbein, in fact, is the former CEO of Adult Video News and creator of the AVN awards show. So on paper it seems like this series would work. It’s even got parallels to 50 Shades. But I don’t know a single person who’s seen it and the show’s outlook for a season 2 is shaky, to put it mildly.

Here’s the plot: sexually frustrated Ashley ditches her boring boyfriend and decides to roommate with an old friend, Jules. Jules has an additional roomie, Dylan, who’s night and day different from Ashley. Dylan’s a sexually open, do-it-with-anyone kinda gal. She’s also a submissive. When Ashley meets Dylan’s master, Elliott, and becomes the object of his desire, giving Dylan the boot, things get interesting indeed. Nothing like a pissed-off subbie out for revenge. Dylan, as it turns out, knows something about Elliott that he’d rather keep secret. So unless Ashley does exactly what Dylan wants, Elliott’s in a heap o’ trouble. And naturally, adding fuel to Elliott’s fire, by this time he and Ashley are in love. Conflict abounds! Late-night smutty TV at its best. Oh, and then there’s the sex. Did I mention that?

I looked up deets on the show on IMDB and wasn’t exactly shocked to learn that the character of Dylan is played by former adult video star, Raylin Joy, whose stage name is Skin Diamond. Her character is the most sexually daring of the bunch. But here’s the interesting thing about the actress. She was born in the U.S. but lived most of her adolescent life in the U.K. She studied Dramatic Arts and her favorite subjects were ancient Greek theater and Shakespeare. For her acting final exam she played Antigone in the Sophocles play. With a theater geek background, why porn? She’s quoted as saying, “as an independent and highly sexual woman, taking charge of my own personal sexual growth in this manner was immensely empowering.”

Certainly comparisons can be drawn between Ms. Joy’s statement about her acting and why some of us choose to read and write erotic romance. There is indeed something personally empowering in creating sexually open characters and having them delve into all kinds of hot wickedness, wherever our naughty little minds choose to take them.

I personally think Showtime dropped the ball by not advertising the dang series. No one’s gonna watch if they don’t know the show exists, amiright?! Who knows if Submission will go beyond a single season, but if you want to see it for yourself, it’s streaming on demand. So if you’re sitting around with nothing to do, now you’ve got some options. 😉

Elizabeth Shore writes both contemporary and historical erotic romance. Her newest book is an erotic historical novella, Desire Rising, from The Wild Rose Press. Other releases include Hot Bayou Nights and The Lady Smut Book of Dark Desires

The end of an awful marriage might be the beginning of something smoking hot. Click to buy.

 

 

 

 

 

Big Brother Censoring You

11 Jan

Don’t look, it’s not good for you

By Elizabeth Shore

Isn’t it nice that nowadays porn viewing can be simple and discreet? No need to truck on down to a seedy video store and rent tapes while ignoring the cashier’s smirking face. Or, worse yet, slink into some stained-filled booth and watch videos in semi-public. With the age of the internet, it’s a piece of cake! One’s porn viewing can be done in the privacy of home. Just launch your browser and go to town. Oh, wait. Maybe not if you live in South Carolina.

Palmetto-state dwellers can watch porn on their computers, too, but if a certain legislator has his way, that might change. Residents will still be able to do it – as long as they pay for permission. State Rep Bill Chumley (R) has put forth a bill that would require all new computers sold in the state to come pre-installed with porn-blocking software. Don’t want it, you say? You like watching naked people online? Good news – that pesky software can be removed as long as you ante-up a $20 fee.

Admittedly, $20 bucks isn’t much, and the money would go toward the state attorney general’s efforts toward anti-sex trafficking. Rep Chumley, who says this is an issue he’s “pretty passionate about,” says the blocker would prevent kids from accessing obscene material or from being exploited themselves (just how that would work Rep Chumley hasn’t elaborated on, but it sounds good). So, in other words, Chumley’s “pretty passionate” about state-sponsored censorship.

This all might sound like a whole lotta public shaming, but South Carolina’s not alone in their war against porn. In April last year, Utah officially declared porn a “public health crisis” by passing a resolution declaring that porn is “evil, degrading, addictive, and harmful” and hoping the resolution will work to unite communities in trying to stop it. After all, if it’s a public health crisis, like obesity, for example, than surely it must be costing communities tons o’ money in lost revenue, right? Except that studies are conflicted as to whether viewing pornography – even at a young age – has a detrimental physical or psychological effect, and therefore it’s unclear what “public health costs” pornography brings about. Details!

Aside from the legislation publically shaming new computer buyers into having to admit they want their porn, the whole issue of free speech comes into play. Isn’t blocking an expression of something equivalent to blocking the right to express it? Courts in the past have struck down proposed laws to block porn, citing First Amendment rights, but South Carolina’s Chumley says  the concern isn’t based on morality or free speech. It’s corrupting people! That’s why it must be blocked.

Exactly what will come of this legislation, if anything, remains to be seen. Nowadays porn is everywhere and filters or not, getting it for free is as easy as a couple clicks of the mouse. According to an article in The Washington Post, porn trafficking website Pornhub had one of its biggest years ever in 2015, so the appetite for porn has only increased. But that seems to be the very reason congressmen (and yes, it’s men behind the legislation), are passionate about starting conversations around the evil ills of porn – because it is indeed so ubiquitous.

Public health hazard? Evil ill of society? Cool thing that millions want? The debate against porn rages on, which is exactly what legislators say is the aim of their resolution: to get people talking about porn.

So…do you like a little government with your porn? Does the South Carolina porn blocking resolution make sense? Sound off in the comments below, and be sure to follow us at Lady Smut, where we’ve always got ways to get people talking.

Reawakening Sleeping Beauty

12 Oct

Several years ago I attended a romance conference in which Anne Rice made a guest appearance in order to help promote the new release Beguiled, written by her sister, the late Alice Borchardt. After a brief discussion about Alice’s book, the conversation quickly turned to Anne’s Sleeping Beauty trilogy. One intrepid but shy audience member raised her hand to ask about Anne’s “erotic series” when Anne interrupted her and said, “You mean my porn?”

The release of those books caused a feminist outcry that they were examples of female degradation. Anne Rice has countered that her trilogy is “elegantly sensual” and harmless to readers. I’ve also read that she considers the series her political statement about women’s right to read and write whatever they pleased. The books were major bestsellers for her, out-earning what she made from Interview With The Vampire.

If this all sounds rather familiar, it should. We’ve had a resurrection of the discussion in the popular media on erotica and erotic romance with the 50 Shades releases. They’ve been pulled off library shelves (just as the Sleeping Beauty trilogy was), been celebrated for reigniting tired married couples’ intimacy, and been decried by writers aplenty as poorly written schlock. When Sleeping Beauty was released it caused outrage among conservatives and feminists and is included in the American Library Association’s list of the “100 most frequently challenged books” of the 1990’s. On the flip side, it’s also developed a cult following, particularly among the BDSM community.

I read the Sleeping Beauty trilogy, and I read all three 50 Shades as well. As an avid consumer of books in general and romance in particular, I wanted to see what all the fuss was about. Moreover, I’m interested in whether it’s erotic, erotic romance, or just plain ‘ol porn. And I guess this is where it gets tricky for me. According to Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary, pornography is defined as “obscene writings, drawings, photographs or the like, having little or no artistic merit.” Whoa. If that’s not a can of worms I don’t know what is. I’m backing away with my hands held high.

Next March will be the 30 year anniversary since the first of the Beauty releases. How far have we as readers of erotic romance come since that day? In my opinion, quite far. There’s been an explosion of electronic romance publishers who allow us writers to push the boundaries of eroticism while staying within the confines of romance. There’s a very large dedicated romance audience, with new readers coming on board every day. Yes, there are still groups of people who shun the genre, and that’s OK, too, as long as they don’t try to force others to do the same. For those of you who haven’t read the Sleeping Beauty trilogy, I urge you to give it a look. For those who have, it might be fun to dust off your copy and enjoy it a second time and, as Anne Rice said, celebrate the fact that we can read it – or not – as we please.

Have a great weekend, everyone!

Elizabeth

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